Mountains Wanderlust

There is something very therapeutic about looking at a vast expanse of snow-capped mountains. Even the short hikes I recently did at Salzkammergut in Austria & Konigssee in Germany did wonders to my weary urbanite side. Never underestimate the healing powers of mother nature!

As a somewhat nature junkie, there are several treks which I really want to do. This is definitely one bucket list that I will be obsessively trying to tick all the items off.

1. Himalayas, India

Will you just look at that! This trek is done from the Indian side of the mountain range, via Himachal Pradesh and involves 24 days of brutal trekking along the mountain tops from Spiti to Ladakh. The bleak high-altitude desert terrain inspired Rudyard Kipling to exclaim, ‘Surely the gods live here; this is no place for men’.

2. Overland Track, Tasmania, Australia

This is an 80km trek from Cradle Mountain to Lake St. Claire in beautiful, beautiful Tasmania. When I went there in 2007 I’ve done most of the bushwalks around Cradle Mountain, Dove Lake and Lake St. Claire on separate occasions (we took a Tassielink bus from Cradle Mt. to Lake St. Claire). We heard about the Overland Track and read about people who had done it. Apparently it took some 7 days and you would need to camp out in the mountains, and at that time we city kids were unfortunately not up for it. Anyway, the Overland Track consists of well-defined path (boardwalked in parts) which passes craggy mountains, beautiful lakes and tarns, extensive forests and moorlands. I really love Tasmania, and I will definitely go back!

3. Patagonia, Argentina & Chile

Shared by Argentina & Chile, Patagonia is a must for every avid trekker and mountain lover. Though it is now being visited by more and more travelers, Patagonia remains a land of wild nature, large spaces, pristine lakes and unconquerable peaks. Among the Patagonia’s most spectacular treks are the Fitz Roy Range trails, Torres del Paine National Park, and Glacier Perito Moreno as well as Tierra del Fuego, an archipelago off the southernmost tip of the South American mainland, perfect for lone wolf type of trekkers.

Ok so South America is still somewhat off my radar. But slowly & surely I will inch my way there. Starting from Patagonia, and then the Salar Uyuni in Bolivia (which has been onthe list since forever). Oh yes.

4. GR 20, Corsica, France

This demanding 15- day (168km) slog through Corsica is legendary for the diversity of landscapes it traverses. There are forests, granite moonscapes, windswept craters, glacial lakes, torrents, peat bogs, maquis, snow-capped peaks, plains and névés (stretches of ice formed from snow). But it doesn’t come easy: the path is rocky and sometimes steep, and includes rickety bridges and slippery rock faces – all part of the fun. Created in 1972, the GR20 links Calenzana, in the Balagne, with Conca, north of Porto Vecchio.

5. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

The highest mountain in Africa at 5,895 metres. There are several routes to climb the mountain – Machame & Marangu being the most popular. Machame is the most scenic route but it’s a steeper climb and takes 6-7 days. The Rongai is the easiest and least scenic of all camping routes with the most difficult summit night and the Marangu is also relatively easy, but accommodation is in shared huts with all other climbers. As a result, this route tends to be very busy, and ascent and descent routes are the same.

6. Hiking in Iceland

I’m not sure where to start with Iceland, because I’ve seen so many breathtaking pictures of mountains, fjords, glaciers & volcanoes, it seems that the whole country is going to be one epic walk!

This picture below is a trek to Iceland’s most active volcano, Eyjafjallajökul.

And I have not even started on Denali in Alaska and of course the Everest Base Camp Trek in Nepal! 19 days of annual leave is not enough, I tell you.

Credits for pictures & some texts from Wild Junket and Lonely Planet.


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  1. A memorable moment in GR20 | Esential Scenic Mountian Trekks - July 3, 2014

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